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The Power of Your Car's Fuel Economy

October 07, 2015

Everyone wants the biggest bang for their buck, especially when it comes to buying a vehicle. You want the best vehicle for yourself, your family, your job and your commute, but you also want it to save you money at the pump. When you decide to compare vehicles, it can be tedious, but we have a list of five different car models and how they stack up on miles per gallon (MPG).

All of the cars below are 2015-2016 models, and each of them run on regular gasoline or the ever popular E85, an ethanol fuel blend. All of the statistics come from the United States Department of Energy based on its findings and comparisons across different makes and models.

Take a look at the vehicles that get the best MPG, and decide for yourself if it’s worth saving money at the gas station!

Small Cars

An easy way to save on gas is to trade space for fuel economy. Less weight means a car has to use less fuel to get around town. Combined fuel economy ranges from 50 MPG to 25 MPG for most 2015-2016 small cars that run on regular gasoline or E85.

The Toyota Prius c has the highest MPG of all small cars ranked by the U.S. Department of Energy at 50 MPG, followed by the Honda Civic Hybrid and the Mitsubishi Mirage.

A Mitsubishi Mirage can be driven off the lot for between $13,000 and $15,000, getting 37 MPG in the city, 44 on the highway. Drivers will spend about $850 fueling up at the tank each year. Compared to the average new vehicle, the Mirage will save you $3,000 over five years.

The Toyota Prius c is one of the more affordable hybrid options, with a price ranging from $19,540 to $24,475. The average annual fuel cost is $700, with drivers saving $3,750 over five years compared to the average new vehicle. The car gets 53 MPG for city driving or 46 on the highway.

A Honda Civic Hybrid starts at $24,735 and tops out at $27,435. Drivers spend $800 per year refueling, but will save $3,250 over the course of five years compared to the average new vehicle. The Civic Hybrid gets 47 MPG on the highway and 44 in the city.

Sporty Cars

As expected, fun and sleek cars don’t receive the greatest combined fuel economy. Most 2015-2016 models that run on regular gasoline or E85 receive a combined fuel economy between 37 MPG and 11 MPG.

The sporty cars with the best combined fuel economy include the Honda CR-Z, the Mazda 3 5-Door, and the Hyundai Veloster.

A Mazda 3 5-Door gets 40 MPG on the highway, compared to 30 in the city. It costs $1,050 per year in gas and drivers will save $2,000 over the course of five years compared to the average new vehicle. The Mazda 3 starts at $18,945, going up to $26,595.

The Hyundai Veloster gets 36 highway MPG, 27 in the city. It costs $1,150 per year to keep the tank full and drivers save $1,500 over the course of five years, compared to the average new vehicle. Prices range from $18,000 to $24,600.

The Honda CR-Z gets very similar mileage no matter where you’re driving; 39 MPG on the highway, 36 in the city. Annual fuel costs are $950, while owners save $2,500 in fuel costs over five years compared to average new vehicles. The CR-Z starts at $20,145 and hits $24,140 with all the options.

Luxury Cars

Luxury cars also tend to have a lower combined fuel economy than small cars, with a range between 42 MPG and 11 MPG for cars that run on regular gasoline or E85.

The top 2015-2016 luxury car models with the highest combined fuel economy are the Lexus CT 200h, the Lincoln MKZ Hybrid, and the Lexus ES 300h.

A Lexus CT 200h is a hybrid that averages 40 MPG on the highway and 43 in the city. Fuel costs per year are $850 on average, while the vehicle will save its owners $3,000 in gas over five years compared to the average new vehicle. A new CT 200h costs $32,200.

Another Lexus hybrid, the ES 300h, gets 40 MPG in the city and 39 in the city. Drivers looking to buy one will spend $40,580. Fuel costs for a year are $850 on average and drivers will save $3,000 in gas over five years compared to the average new vehicle.

Minivans

The family-friendly minivan may seem like a gas-sucker, but the combined fuel economy probably isn’t as low as you think. The range is small for 2015-2016 minivans that run on regular gasoline or E85, with the highest combined fuel economy at 24 MPG, and the lowest at 19 MPG.

The most fuel efficient minivans are the Mazda 5, the Nissan Quest and the Honda Odyssey.

The Mazda 5 costs $21,240 to $24,770 and gets 28 MPG on the highway, 21 in the city. Annual fuel cost is $1,450 and drivers don’t save any money over five years compared to the average new vehicle.

A Nissan Quest gets 27 miles per gallon on the highway, 20 in the city. Quest owners spend $750 more over five years than the owner of the average new vehicle does, with $1,600 per year in average fuel costs. A Quest starts at $26,530 and tops out at $43,180.

A Honda Odyssey reaches 28 MPG on the highway, 19 in the city. Odyssey owners also spend $750 more in fuel costs over five years and $1,600 per year in gas. MSRP starts at $28,975, going up to $44,600.

Pickups

The all-terrain vehicle that can help you in any situation has a lower-than-average combined fuel economy compared to other cars. The 2015-2016 models that run on regular gasoline and E85 average between 24 MPG and 10 MPG.

The top fuel economy pickups are the Toyota Tacoma, the Chevrolet Colorado, and the GMC Canyon.

The Toyota Tacoma gets 24 MPG on the highway, 19 in the city and has annual fuel costs of $1,650. Over the course of five years it costs $1,000 more for a Tacoma’s gas than the average new vehicle. The truck starts at $20,965, up to $25,560.

A Chevy Colorado also costs $1,000 more in fuel costs over five years, compared to the average new vehicle, and gets 26 MPG on the highway, 18 in the city. Annual fuel costs are $1,650, with the truck costing $20,120-$30,785.

The GMC Canyon gets 26 MPG on the highway and 18 in the city. The Canyon ranges from $20,995-$33,420 and costs $1,000 more to fuel over five years than the average new vehicle. Annual fuel costs are $1,650.

After you’ve compared makes, models, and gas mileages, you’re probably ready to make that first step to investing in a new vehicle! Make sure that you are protecting your new vehicle with the proper insurance for everyday life. Get into the driver’s seat and start safeguarding your new purchase today.

Sources:

https://www.fueleconomy.gov/feg/findacar.shtml